When designing a Wordmark logo one of the first things to think about is the type of font to be used.

So firstly what is a Wordmark logo? A Wordmark or Typographical logo is a logo that is made utilising the letters of the business name. That is it’s a text only representation, which can involve the creative arrangement and modification of words to present a visual identity for a brand. The representation of the word becomes a visual symbol of the organisation or product.

So what are the common font types that are used in wordmark logos?

Serif Fonts

Serif typefaces tend to be thought of as classic and traditional.

Serif fonts have a line or a small decorative flourish on the ends of the strokes that make up letters and symbols. They are believed to have originated from the Latin alphabet Romans used to etch their writings into stone, so when the stone carvers followed the brush marks, which flared at ends, that resulted in the creation of serifs.

An example of a Wordmark logo using a Serif font is Time Magazine. It has a classical look that demonstrates it’s longstanding place in the market.

Business-Logo-Design

Some Common Serif Fonts Include:

  • Times new Roman
  • Georgia
  • Palatino
  • Garamond
  • Century Schoolbook
  • Bookman

Sans Serif Fonts

Sans-serif, literally means “without serifs”, from the French sans, meaning “without”. Any font that is absent of the small decorative flourish on the ends of the strokes, as in a Serif font, can be considered as a Sans-serif font.

An example of a Sans-serif font usage is in the Facebook Logo, which is based on a modified version of the Sans-serif font Klavika. It’s modern and elegant and with its dark-blue background, make the logo very recognisable.

Company-Logo-Desig
The Facebook logo is the perfect example of a minimal, yet most recognisable logo utilising a Sans-serif font.

Some Common Sans-serif Fonts Include:

  • Arial
  • Verdana
  • Helvetica
  • Tahoma
  • Impact

Selecting the right type of font to use in a logo design is of utmost importance. Your first concern is choosing a font type that matches the message or purpose of your design. If the characteristics the font is communicating don’t match the message of your overall design, then there will be a visual disconnect for the viewers and prospective clients.

One final thing, you may have heard the text you use in logo design is referred to as both fonts and typefaces and wondered if the two terms mean the same thing. Technically and historically (in terms of typesetting) they are different, but basically today, they’re often used interchangeably.

fonts-&-logo-Design